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Gasquet could be the big mover in 2008

Scott Ferguson looks at who the movers and shakers could be amongst the current Top 10 players on the ATP and WTA tours

originally published on betting.betfair.com

Instead of trawling through the 50-200 ranked players in order to find the big movers of the year, let's take a look at the top 10s and what I think they will look like come December 08.

1. Roger Federer. He lost nine times in 2007 and still had 1400pts to spare at the top of the rankings. And his main danger allegedly can't put in the legwork to make that step up.

2. Novak Djokovic. Getting ever closer to the top and still improving. Capable on all courts, leaving him more room to gather points. But is he now the hunted?

3. Rafael Nadal. Just three losses on clay in three years (107 wins), but the pack is getting closer. If Ferrer and Nalbandian can beat him indoors, then it's not impossible to see him being pressured on the clay. His chronic foot problems could be just an excuse in advance, or the ailment which may force him to space out his campaign.

4. David Ferrer. A big finish to 2007 on a range of surfaces make him likely to press for Masters Series titles and more.

5. Richard Gasquet. Once he gets his head right, he should be a permanent fixture in the top five. That's no guarantee though.

.....


Now for the ladies

1. Justine Henin. The only thing threatening her is the perceived frailty of her body. Serena might trouble her a few times per year, but outside of that, she simply dominates the women's tour.

2. Ana Ivanovic. Closing in on the top ranks and the experience of getting close at Roland Garros, Wimbledon and the year-end championships will serve her well. Expect to see her regularly in finals this year.

3. Maria Sharapova. Early signs are that her shoulder is back in full working order, which means look out for her opponents.

4. Jelena Jankovic. Has had nasal surgery in the off-season to correct breathing problems. How much can her body put up with? So many events, and so many thrashings by Henin. Not a lot of upside left for her unless she can start winning the big events, and that could be in the mind.

5. Serena Williams. Is talking up a big season by her standards, which means about 14 events. Unless she wins two Slams and stays fit, I can't see her going much higher.

.....

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