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Karma in sport

Am I the only one that casts a wry smile over these types of incidents?

- Flavio Briatore has to fall on his sword when sacked driver Nelson Piquet Jr gets his own back by blowing the whistle on being instructed to crash in the Singapore Grand Prix last year to help his team-mate Fernando Alonso win the race. After initial denials and threats of lawsuits, a newspaper gets hold of the transcripts and suddenly the facts come out....

- Serena Williams getting a point penalty for threatening an official at the US Open and thus losing the match. Not just any match, but a Grand Slam semi-final. Had she not destroyed a racuet earlier in the match, she may have even got away with it. Whether the line judge was correct or not with the call(I still haven't seen any camera angle which proves it either way), no sporting official should ever be threatened like that, and she should have been defaulted for that alone. Using American sport as an example, she'd have been suspended for months if she tried that in the NFL or NBA.

- Kieren Fallon getting mighty lucky when the Metropolitan Police could not prove the race-fixing case despite the weight of evidence, then getting suspended days later for testing positive to cocaine again in France.

Karma is a wonderful thing, it helps me sleep at night....

Any other classic examples people can recall?


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