Skip to main content

Match-fixing update

You'd have to have been living in a cave for the past week not to have heard about the Scottish football betting scam involving some of Wayne Rooney's family. This game was suspicious from the outset and was highlighted here back in December.

The match-fixing investigation into Turkish football is experiencing some resistance. The 'holier than thou' officials implicated in the scandal want the prosecutor removed from the case because he doesn't believe their lame excuses! Typical reaction of remorseless, self-indulgent megalomaniacs who believe they are above the law.

(Note, this section has been edited since original post to correct a few things)

In cricket this week, the big story has been the trial of the Pakistan spot-fixing handler, Mazhar Majeed. The accused is wrapped up in his own ego, continually dropping names of his supposed friends and contacts, and raving on about how much power he holds over certain players. The evidence against him is damning, there is no doubting that, so he is going down grabbing as many headlines as he can. Today's highlight from the secret recordings - accusing Australian cricketers of being heavily involved in spot-fixing. Does he have any facts to back up his accusations or just spinning bullshit in private to suck someone into paying for his next Ferrari? Dustbin Cricket posted an article about the unlikelihood of it, but one can't be totally naive about it. I think the guy is just a Grade 1 bullshit artist with a major grudge against Australia (and England - he has stated he had several English players in his pocket as well), but I'm not that one-eyed to believe it is completely impossible. He won't be held accountable for his outlandish statements, he is only answering to the charges at hand - so expect to hear loads more bullshit from his fantasy world. He has complete freedom to make up as much baseless crap as he likes with no fear of retribution.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

It's all gone Pete Tong at Betfair!

The Christmas Hurdle from Leopardstown, a good Grade 2 race during the holiday period. But now it will go into history as the race which brought Betfair down. Over £21m at odds of 29 available on Voler La Vedette in-running - that's a potential liability of over £500m. You might think that's a bit suspicious, something's fishy, especially with the horse starting at a Betfair SP of 2.96. Well, this wasn't a horse being stopped by a jockey either - the bloody horse won! Look at what was matched at 29. Split that in half and multiply by 28 for the actual liability for the layer(s). (Matched amounts always shown as double the backers' stake, never counts the layers' risk). There's no way a Betfair client would have £600m+ in their account. Maybe £20 or even £50m from the massive syndicates who regard(ed) Betfair as safer than any bank, but not £600m. So the error has to be something technical. However, rumour has it, a helpdesk reply (not gospel, natur

lay the field - my favourite racing strategy

Dabbling with laying the field in-running at various prices today, not just one price, but several in the same race. Got several matched in the previous race at Brighton, then this race came along at Nottingham. Such a long straight at Nottingham makes punters often over-react and think the finish line is closer than it actually is. As you can see by the number of bets matched, there was plenty of volatility in this in-play market. It's rare you'll get a complete wipe-out with one horse getting matched at all levels, but it can happen, so don't give yourself too much risk...

What shits me about match-fixing 'journalism'.

The anti-wagering media bandwagon has dozens of new members this week, all weighing in an industry they have absolutely no idea about. I'm all for getting the betting industry into the mainstream but it shits me no end when they roll out reports and celebrities who simply don't have a clue what they are talking about and don't bother to check basic facts which key arguments in their story. If this was the financial industry, making errors like this would have them in all sorts of trouble, but the same level of regulation doesn't apply because finance stock markets are supposedly all legitimate and serious, whereas sports betting is just a bit of fun for people who can never win in the long-term... according to the media. This week we have seen the sting by the Telegraph which, on the face of it, looks to be a tremendous piece of investigative work into fixing in English football. But the headlines around it are over-sensationalised yet again. Delroy Facey, a former pla