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the secret list of suspicious tennis players

According to Swedish website, svd.se, this is the list of players the Tennis Integrity Unit keep a close eye on, due to previous matches of interest....

The Black List
Philipp Kohlschreiber
Potito Starace
Andreas Seppi
Fabio Fognini
Janko Tipsarevic
Michael Llodra
Nikolay Davydenko
Teymuraz Gabashvili
Victor Crivoi
Christophe Rochus
Oscar Hernandez
Yevgeny Korolev
Filippo Volandri
Wayne Odesnik
Victoria Azarenka
Agnieszka Radwanska
Francesca Schiavone
Sara Errani
Maria Kirilenko
Kateryna Bondarenko


... And 21 on the warning list: Brian Dabul, Eduardo Scwhank, Jeremy Chardy, Simone Bolelli, Lukasz Kubot *, Carlos Berlocq, Igor Kunitsyn, Andrei Golubev *, Alex Bogomolov, Somdev Devvar-man *, Steve Darcis, Marin Cilic, Flavio Cipolla, Ivo Karlovic, Viktor Troicki, Flavia Pennetta, Roberta Vinci, Virginie Razzano, Romina Oprandi, Dominika Cibulkova, Eleni Daniilidou. * Participating in this year's Stockholm Open

For the full article, run this link through Google Translate - 41 tennis names on blacklist

The explanation of match-fixing is rather simplistic, and doesn't include the far more common habit of sharing sets in order to capitalise on in-play betting fluctuations.

I'm surprised at most of the female names up there, and suspect they are missing several more names on the men's side....

With thanks to @ne0genic and @tenniscrocks for the link.

Comments

  1. Very interesting! Like you, I am surprisd at many of those female names, particularly Radwanska and Kirilenko, who I have always had down as model professionals.

    Not surprised with most of the men however! The likes of Llodra, Davydenko, Tipsarevic, Gabashvilli, Shwank and Volandri have been involved in very obvious dodgy matches in recent years, more than once for some.

    You'll also notice that 11 of those players are Italian. I'm saying nothing...........

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  2. some of these may be down to injury news leaks, which can easily be caught in the same net.

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  3. re the Italians - perfectly befitting their culture and economy. If there were any Greeks in professional tennis, they'd probably be there too! (Daniilidou on the watch list I see)

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  4. Errani would be at the top of my WTA list so many times this year she gave the 1st set away when starting as big fav only to win the 2nd easy such on obv pattern in her games...and how is Andreev not on there

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  5. Bit harsh about Errani, PDK. Had a look out of curiosity and there was a pattern in one tournament, Pattaya back in Feb. She came from behind 3 times in a row. Maybe that is why she's on the list?

    Apart from that, she's only come from behind to win on 2 occassions. 5 times in one season isn't really enough to label her as dodgy. Maybe she got a warning after Pattaya!

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  6. you miss the point sultan she doesn't need to win....did you not trade/see the game with cibulcova who is also on the list.. a classic Errani rig

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  7. lol, I'm amazed Elena Baltacha and Anne Keothavong aren't on that list for the amount of times they have chucked away a one set lead and a winning position.

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  8. Any spectator who has paid for a ticket and supports the players in good faith is understandably going to be hostile towards match fixing. People picked up on Venus Williams gifting matches to her sister early in their career, but the complaints were labelled as racist... hmmm....

    ReplyDelete

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