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Byrne Group Plate Handicap Chase preview

Once again it's Dan Kelly attacking a wide open handicap..


Whereas yesterday was a day for the market leaders this race most certainly hasn't been punter friendly with last 4 winners being priced 25/1 18/1 33/1 66/1 and I fancy an upset here. These are my 3 against the field:

Matuhi ran a good 6th in this race last year off 135, and even though here rated 144 I feel he has a better chance round this time round. He finished third behind Calgary Bay and Hectors Choice back here on New Years Day, both have gone on to bigger and better things, Calgary Bay winning the Skybet Chase, and Hectors Choice running a gallant second to Nacarat in the Racing Plus Chase. What is the clincher for me is Tom Bellamy in the saddle. Not only does he take 10lbs off his back, this claimer is 3 from 7 over fences, and won at this track back in November on Swing Bill.

As per my thoughts on the Jewson, Micheal Flips is running in the wrong race, and on the back of that I think the drop back in trip is going to suit The Cockney Mackem greatly. He has form on good ground, and his run behind Micheal Flips reads well given what he did in the Scilly Isles. Wouldn't be Cheltenham without a Twiston-Davies winner.

An interesting jockey booking is the basis of the final selection, Paddy Brennan on Life Of A Luso. Ran a good 3rd to Billie Magern here in October, and a decent 5th over hurdles in April shows the track will not be an issue. Never jumped at Ascot, and was given a sighter at Kempton, picking up best part of £3k in the process. Overpriced in a race that is full of exposed handicappers.

Follow Dan on Twitter, @muffinmannhc.

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