Skip to main content

Goodwood - Lennox Stakes preview

Sam Preen, @sampreen, returns to the spotlight with his look at the Lennox Stakes.

---------------

BET365 LENNOX STAKES (3:10 GLORIOUS GOODWOOD – TUESDAY)

A field of 7 runners line up for the Lennox Stakes, with Paul D’Arcy sending in William Hill Lincoln fourth Edinburgh Knight. He has been very unlucky this season so far, finishing second on his last two starts down in trip at Newmarket and Ascot respectably. He has a very pleasing record over 7 furlongs and with William Buick getting the leg up again, he could run a very big race.

William Haggas sends in Highclere’s Firebeam, who had a very impressive career aside from a blemish at Longchamp in June when he faded to eighth in Group 3 company. He went on to run a respectable race down in trip at Newbury but the heavy conditions combined with taking a keen hold soon sapped his stamina and he went on to finish second behind Soul. Ryan Moore gets the leg up for the first time and their one to be taken seriously.

Libranno‘s shown the fire’s still there when racing up a quick double in June, taking a Listed race at Salisbury before going onto claim the scalp of Edinburgh Knight, who lock horns again here. He has a good record here, with his last run over course and distance beating 2010 1000 Guineas “winner” (Disqualified and placed second in controversial circumstances) Jacqueline Quest. He stands a good chance of getting the hat trick but faces a stiff task against the other in form runners.

The ageing Mac Love heads here for his 77th start under rules, and with a losing run heading back nearly 3 years. His first run as an 11 year old came last month when finishing third of six in Group 3 company at Epsom over 9f, finishing a half length in front of the favourite Worthadd. He was a good horse back in the day but looks unlikely to threat the younger runners here.

Richard Fahey’s Majestic Myles has been in the form of his life recently, romping to success at Chester in testing conditions last time out. He boasts good form in Group races, and ran in the 2011 renewal of this race. Yet to win at Goodwood in two starts, it looks unlikely he’ll win today but could run into a place.

Chachamaidee has been in the form of her life recently, making a strong impression on her return as a five year old at Lingfield, taking a Group 3 in impressive fashion on her first start on the Polytrack course. Sadly, her winning ways came to an end at Ascot when a slow start cost her six lengths at the start but showed her now familiar turn of foot to run on late before getting reeled in by the fast finishing Joviality. She won the Oak Tree Stakes over course and distance last year and with conditions to suit, she could run another big race.

Bryan Smart sends his stable star Foxtrot Romeo for this over the Sussex Stakes, in which he would have locked horns with the mighty Frankel. Last seen finishing sixth of 16 runners behind Most Improved at Ascot earlier in the month, he ran the race of his life to finish behind Power in the Irish 2000 Guineas back in May on his return as a 3 year old, and he’s expected to run another big race here.

Conclusion: A tough race here, which Bryan Smart supplemented Foxtrot Romeo at the last minute. He could run another huge race but preference is for CHACHAMAIDEE, who has been in the form on her life this season and has the conditions to suit and the benefit of winning over course and distance last year. Of the rest, Firebeam could fill up a place claim.

You can read plenty more of Sam's work on his blog.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

It's all gone Pete Tong at Betfair!

The Christmas Hurdle from Leopardstown, a good Grade 2 race during the holiday period. But now it will go into history as the race which brought Betfair down. Over £21m at odds of 29 available on Voler La Vedette in-running - that's a potential liability of over £500m. You might think that's a bit suspicious, something's fishy, especially with the horse starting at a Betfair SP of 2.96. Well, this wasn't a horse being stopped by a jockey either - the bloody horse won! Look at what was matched at 29. Split that in half and multiply by 28 for the actual liability for the layer(s). (Matched amounts always shown as double the backers' stake, never counts the layers' risk). There's no way a Betfair client would have £600m+ in their account. Maybe £20 or even £50m from the massive syndicates who regard(ed) Betfair as safer than any bank, but not £600m. So the error has to be something technical. However, rumour has it, a helpdesk reply (not gospel, natur

What shits me about match-fixing 'journalism'.

The anti-wagering media bandwagon has dozens of new members this week, all weighing in an industry they have absolutely no idea about. I'm all for getting the betting industry into the mainstream but it shits me no end when they roll out reports and celebrities who simply don't have a clue what they are talking about and don't bother to check basic facts which key arguments in their story. If this was the financial industry, making errors like this would have them in all sorts of trouble, but the same level of regulation doesn't apply because finance stock markets are supposedly all legitimate and serious, whereas sports betting is just a bit of fun for people who can never win in the long-term... according to the media. This week we have seen the sting by the Telegraph which, on the face of it, looks to be a tremendous piece of investigative work into fixing in English football. But the headlines around it are over-sensationalised yet again. Delroy Facey, a former pla

Racing has a Ponzi scheme - and the fallout will be enormous

When the term ' Ponzi scheme ' is mentioned these days, the names Bernard Madoff and Allen Stanford instantly spring to mind. The pair of them ran multi-billion dollar frauds (US$60bn and $8bn respectively) that destroyed the lives of thousands of investors who had put their life savings into a 'wonderful' investment strategy. How so many people were sucked into the scheme is baffling to those on the outside. The lifestyle, the sales pitch, the success stories of the early investors - I suppose it all adds up. So where does this link to racing you ask? A prominent Australian 'racing identity' this week has been reported to have lost access to a bank account with punters' club funds of $194m in it. Firstly - is there a worse term for anyone to be labelled with that 'racing identity'? It ALWAYS ends up meaning shonky crook! Secondly - who the hell has a punters' club with an active bankroll in the tens of millions? It simply can't be done. T