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Lance Armstrong is sunk

Today marks the day that the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) finally sent their evidence to the International Cycling Union (UCI) and the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Flat Earth believers, sorry Armstrong supporters, were holding onto the conspiracy theory that USADA weren't sharing the 'evidence' for a reason and that Santa Claus does really exist. Well, if this is a set-up, it's better than anything Hollywood can come up with.

Armstrong case: USADA confirms reasoned decision sent to UCI and WADA, over 1000 pages of evidence

Citing ‘overwhelming evidence’ which amounts to over 1000 pages in length, the US Anti-Doping Agency has confirmed that it is today sending its reasoned decision to the UCI and to WADA in relation to the sanctions against Lance Armstrong.

USADA CEO Travis Tygart will later today release a large amount of that evidence, but has given an overview of what those sporting bodies plus the general public can expect. He states that evidence includes sworn testimony from 26 people, of which 15 are riders with knowledge of the US Postal Service Team (USPS Team) and its participants’ doping activities.

Eleven of Armstrong’s former team-mates have been named today, with Frankie Andreu, Michael Barry, Tom Danielson, Tyler Hamilton, George Hincapie, Floyd Landis, Levi Leiphimer, Stephen Swart, Christian Vande Velde, Jonathan Vaughters and David Zabriskie all confirmed as having cooperated.

In addition to that, Tygart states that the evidence ‘also includes direct documentary evidence including financial payments, emails, scientific data and laboratory test results that further prove the use, possession and distribution of performance enhancing drugs by Lance Armstrong and confirm the disappointing truth about the deceptive activities of the USPS Team, a team that received tens of millions of American taxpayer dollars in funding.’ .
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Tygart states that the evidence amassed shows that the US Postal Service Pro Cycling Team ‘ran the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen.’

“The USPS Team doping conspiracy was professionally designed to groom and pressure athletes to use dangerous drugs, to evade detection, to ensure its secrecy and ultimately gain an unfair competitive advantage through superior doping practices. A program organized by individuals who thought they were above the rules and who still play a major and active role in sport today.”

Read more here:

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'Champions of charity' have taken a real blow in recent months with the legacy of two huge names being shredded when the truth about their lives came out. Must make everyone else who isn't using charity work as a means to clear their conscience physically sick...

Comments

  1. Do you think they will catch Wiggins and co one day? I give them 5 years before they're caught.

    ReplyDelete
  2. dunno, not convinced they are doping. Reading the article re the 1999 tests which first set off the alarm bells about Armstrong, the % of positive samples for a drug which nobody knew they were testing for was under 10%. That was supposed to be when there was a culture change against doping. Perhaps there has been a seachange. I don't know, I hope they (Wiggins, Evans, anyone else successful in last few years) don't get caught simply because there is nothing to catch them for. Let's see...

    ReplyDelete

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