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Investec Dash preview

Fast and furious, that's the Investec Dash down a 5f track which certainly could not be described as flat! William Kedjanyi, @keejayOV, again with the preview.

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Investec Corporate Banking 'Dash'
Class 2 Heritage Handicap
5f £100k 1545 local 0045 AEST


A wonderful sight down one of the fastest 5 furlongs in the world, this comes with the usual wealth warning as every one of the 20 runners can be considered in some fashion. Monsieur Joe leaps off the page, having improved with every run since comeback back to the UK from the UAE, with his fourth at the Ebor meeting, third at Ripon and then victory in another fiercely contested sprint handicap. His ability to come from the rear at York, a sharp flat track which created a similar test in speed terms to Epsom, gives great encouragement for similar tactics to be tried here – for all that he can race prominently, as showed when third at Ripon when he ran keen early. A draw of 7 may lead to him needing to be dropped in today, but that is not necessarily a major negative given his running style; The collateral level of his form looks to be as strong any horse in the field and he makes each/way appeal.

Of those at the very top of the market, last year’s victor Caspian Prince (with Seeking Magic second, Steps fourth and Barnet fair sixth), a winner at Meydan off a mark just 3lbs lower, would have to be top of the shortlist. His two tries in Group company have seen him attain a very fair UK mark. The progressive Perfect Muse shaped very well on both her final start of last season and also on her Godwood return, and off the same mark with Cam Hardie taking off 3lbs, merits close consideration today.

Seeking Magic has gained himself a very useful mark – he’s now 6lbs lower than when just losing out to Caspian Prince last year – and should be thereabouts if all tuned up for today, having shaped with encouragement on his return at Newmarket.

The lethal amount of pace that will be on the front end here brings Steps, a close fourth last year, into the reckoning here and the draw is of less importance to him than others. A horse who has won second time out in three of the past four seasons, he should be coming late. There were signs that Humidor was not on a going day before the stalls opened at Goodwood but his previous success at Goodwood off just a 4lbs lower mark suggests that he’s capable of outrunning his odds.

Barnet Fair may need some luck in running, which can be said for quite a few, but if getting it, has fair claims at the least. While the selection is drawn 7, low draws are hard to overcome for front runners so Chiclet and Monumental Man have been badly positioned considering their aggressive run styles, for all that both were hugely taking last time out in victory.

Desert Law, for the same connections as Monsieur Joe, will have a tough time getting to the lead from 1 but if dropped in, could go well. Everything needs to drop right for 2011 second Confessional and 2013 second Smoothalkinrascal, for all that they cannot actually be ruled out; 2013 winner Duke of Firenze has not beaten a rival off his revised mark of 101 in two starts this year Starting from off the rail, Silvanus had an advantageous draw at Chester but couldn’t defy his current mark there.

Advice: 1 pt each/way Monsieur Joe (14/1 Coral, Bet Victor)

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