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Pontefract Wed May 3 2yo race review

Pontefract 1415 May 3
EBF Novice Stakes
5f, Class 4, 1m3.63s
(slow by 2.13s)
Good to Firm

Brandy Station. Overraced on debut at Redcar on Apr 10, beaten almost 10L. Jumped well, straight to the lead despite drifting right and off the rail before the bend. Stoked up on straightening and nothing chased him down. Won easily at 33/1 (specked at 66s).

Jasi. Won at Southwell on debut on Apr 6 in low-rating race. Broke well, sat second. Unable to go with the leader on straightening and made no further impression. Kept on well to keep others at bay.

Ventura Dragon. Apr 19, £60k yearling, dam has thrown several winners. Slow to get going, settled near rear. Got serious after th ebend and stayed on well to take third.

Armed Response. Apr 19. 44k gns foal, but only £20k vendor buyback as yearling. Dam sister to G1 winner Prohibit. Slightly slow to begin, pushed up to settle fourth. Mad run from the furlong pole but just plodded on.

Marsh Storm. Third on debut at Newcastle on Good Friday, staying on in last furlong. Sat third on the rail, faded from 1f out when it got too hot for him.

Ventura Crest. Apr 20, £14k yearling. Already gelded. A little slow to get going, settled just behind midfield. Ran into the back of one in straight but had every chance, not going well enough to have made use of a gap anyway.

Admiral Spice. Apr 28, €32k yearling. Half-brother to several winners and well supported, 9/2 into 7/2. Bit green, need slap with the persuader down the side. Made no impression in the straight.

Prediction. Jan 13, 31k gns yearling. First foal of a moderate staying mare. Eased at start from wide draw. Never improved.

KEY POINTS
Winner simply jumped and ran. Nice run from third horse, don't think he's anything great but will take plenty from this run.

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